China Mirrors US List Of Unreliable Entities As US Bans TikTok and WeChat

Screenshot of China Ministry of Commerce announcement of the provisions of the Unreliable Entity List, captured September 19, 2020

IN THE MIDDLE of last year, Beijing announced that it was creating an ‘unreliable entity list’. This mirrored the US administration’s use of its cold-war-era entity list of companies, organisations and individuals Washington held to be involved in ‘activities contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States’.

Beijing today published the regulations of how its version will work — although not the identities of those companies or other entities that are on it. The list will catalogue any entity that poses a threat or potential threat to China’s sovereignty, national security, development and business interests; and those that discriminate against or harm Chinese businesses, organisations or individuals. Those on the list face sanctions from bans on investment to restrictions on work and residence permits and fines. Those come into effect immediately, although listees may be granted a grace period to set right their alleged transgressions.

The new rules were published the day after the US administration banned downloads and transactions related to two Chinese apps, WeChat and TikTok. The restrictions on downloads of the two apps from the Apple and Google app stores take effect from tomorrow (September 20) as does a prohibition on third-party companies providing services within the United States to WeChat such as internet hosting, content delivery networks or peering services.

The third-party services restriction on TikTok is due to take effect on November 12. The stay is to give time for the administration to review a proposed deal whereby the US enterprise-tech giant, Oracle, will take a minority stake in the US and some other international assets of TikTok to satisfy US national security concerns about the video-sharing app’s use of the data it holds on US citizens.

There was a rush to download the apps from the Apple and Google app stores before the bans took effect. It is unclear what penalties US users of the apps will face if they contravene the bans, although the US Treasury is indicating that neither criminal nor civil prosecutions are likely.

The prohibition on using WeChat and its parent Tencent for messaging and for financial transfers and payments aims further the Trump administration’s desire to decouple the two economies. The app is widely used by US businesses and Chinese expats to conduct business with contacts colleagues and customers in China. It has a reported 19 million active daily users in the United States. The Reuters news agency reports that Tencent has quietly developed an enterprise version of WeChat, rebranded as WeCom to avoid the ban, but which it is keeping under-ther-radar in the United States.

As an aside, Beijing recently granted TikTok’s parent, ByteDance a rare new licence to conduct online payments, enabling its Chinese service to move into e-commerce in competition with Alibaba and Tencent, a revenue stream that is out of the question for its US operation, however the ownership of that ends up.

Tencent has said that it will pursue further discussions with the US government while TikTok took the more assertive line that it will continue to challenge what it calls an unjust executive order. The Ministry of Commerce condemned the bans on both apps, promising ‘necessary measures’ to protect the legal interests of Chinese firms, without saying what those might be. Banning US apps in retaliation is not an option as they are already mostly excluded from China.

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