Tag Archives: rebalancing

China’s ‘Achilles’ Heel’ Of Debt

THE IMF’S LATEST Article 4 consultations report on China’s economy retraces some well-trodden ground. While edging up its projections for China’s growth projections, the Fund again underlines the growing risk from debt in the medium term.

Arguably this is the greatest macroeconomic risk that China faces and which the Fund says needs to be addressed now if sustainable growth is to be sustained. It summarises that risk in a supplementary note to the main report thus:

International experience would suggest that China’s credit growth is on a dangerous trajectory with increasing risks of disruptive adjustment and/or a marked growth slowdown.

Managing the debt issue is inseparable from rebalancing the economy, away from infrastructure investment and export-led growth to domestic consumption.

Progress in rebalancing, the Fund acknowledges, is being made, particularly in reducing industrial overcapacity. Borrowing by local governments is being made more transparent, and regulators have started to address financial sector risks.

The Fund, though, calls, as it has repeatedly done in the past, for the pace of reforms to accelerate, taking advantage of the relatively robust growth the economy is now enjoying.

Its check list of five action points will be familiar:

  • boost consumption by increasing social spending by the government and making the tax system more progressive;
  • increase the role of market forces by reducing implicit subsidies to state owned enterprises and opening up more to the private and foreign sectors;
  • deleverage the private sector by continuing the recent regulatory tightening in the financial sector and greater recognition of bad assets in the financial sector;
  • ensure macroeconomic sustainability by focusing more on the quality of growth and less on quantitative targets; and
  • improve policy frameworks so that the economy can be better managed.

The fund particularly recommends accelerating the reform of state owned enterprises by moving social functions away from them and opening their protected sectors to more private and foreign competition.

There will be a cost to that which will strain the financial system. Bankruptcies will rise with the elimination of blanket state guarantees and lenders that have made uncreditworthy loans will get into trouble. The political concern is that strain on the financial system turns into social stress.

IMF China reforms scorecard August 2017

As this Bystander has noted before, policymakers have been steadily if cautiously managing down the GDP growth rate for several years, mostly by reducing too high investment and too rapid credit growth. They have been less active in opening up replacement sources of growth, notably by opening up to the private sector.

The fund also lays great importance on the need to liberate private savings for consumption by increasing public spending on health, pensions and education, three areas in which its spending is well below the OECD average, and by increasing social transfers to the poor, who are disproportionately greater savers than the poor in other countries,

Again as this Bystander and many others have noted before, the longer China delays tackling the structural underpinning of its debt load, the longer resolving them will take and the greater the risk of not doing so becomes.

This is an opportune moment from an economic point of view to do so. Growth in the first half of the year was more robust than expected with both the global economy and financial conditions being benign. Domestically, the effects of cutting industrial capacity are starting to work through, bolstering profits and areas of the private sector where state-owned enterprises are largely absent, such as e-commerce are showing exemplary dynamism.

Also, balance-of-payments and exchange-rate management have been adept while some old-school fiscal stimulus six to nine months ago has also kicked in.

Markus Rodlauer, deputy director of the IMF’s Asia and Pacific Department, put it this way:

The situation at this point right now…should be used as an opportunity…to bear down and to buckle down and continue with this financial sector adjustment, which is really the Achilles’ heel now of the economy.

Once the 19th Party Congress due to be held in October or November is out of the way, and assuming it has not changed politics appreciably, that may happen more visibly.

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IMF Sees Increases In China’s Growth And Debt

THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY Fund (IMF) has upgraded both its economic growth forecast for China in 2018 and the downside risks of debt.

In its July update to its World Economic Outlook, the Fund says its projections reflect the strong first quarter growth this year and expectations of continued fiscal support.

It now says it expects growth next year to be 6.7%, the same as this year and in 2016, and 0.1 percentage point higher than previously forecast. Growth in 2018 is expected to slow by 0.2 percentage points less than previously projected, to 6.4%.

This the Fund believes will be because authorities will sustain high public investment to achieve the target of doubling in real terms 2010’s GDP by 2020. This, in turn, implies that debt levels will not be attacked as actively as needed and financial reforms delayed.

The National Financial Work Conference, the high level policymaking agency chaired by President Xi Jinping that concluded its quinquennial meeting on July 15, emphasized that policymakers’ priority was to deleverage state-owned enterprises (SOEs) within its focus on limiting systemic financial risk.

First, though, Xi has to get through the forthcoming Party plenum, which should provide clues to the strength of his position to tackle the politically powerful interests that control the SOEs.

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China’s Growth Spurt Provides Scope To Tackle Debt

TALK OF A hard landing for the economy seems distant, now. China’s economy grew by 6.9% in the second quarter year-on-year, the same as in the first quarter and well ahead of the official target of 6.5%, the National Statistics Bureau reports.

Quater-to-quarter growth quickened to 1.7% from 1.3%. Industrial output (up 7.6% in the first half) and consumption (retail sales were up 11% in June year-on-year) picked up while investment remained strong, suggesting that measures to control the frothy housing market have not yet worked through, or perhaps are not working as effectively as policymakers intended. Property investment increased by 8.5% year-on-year in the first half.

The extent to which property prices cool over the rest of the year will be closely watched. If they do, despite the solid underpinnings of the recovery, the growth rate may moderate in the second half, though not to the extent the official target will be threatened.

The long-term build-up of structural imbalances, manifest in the growing levels of debt, remains, but the latest growth figures give the leadership some scope for pushing through financial reforms at the party plenum later this year.

Some of those, notably the expansion of bond markets to allow direct financing of local governments and enterprises in place of policy lending by banks, will have been thrashed out at the two-day National Financial Work Conference that ended at the weekend.

That this quinquennial meeting chaired by President Xi Jinping was convened a year late this time indicates how politically contentious economic reform remains, not least because they also intend to rein in the debt of state owned enterprises, themselves powerful political fiefdoms.

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OECD Sees China’s Economy Stabilising But Reform Still Needed

THE OECD QUIETLY prides itself on being the grown-up economic forecaster, eschewing the flash and razzmatazz of the International Monetary Fund or the World Bank for an understated mix of solid economic analysis and policy prescription.

The chapter on China in its latest Economic Outlook fits the bill to a tee: a sparse summary of an economy that is stabilising thanks to earlier policy support, but still needing structural reform if ‘rebalancing’ is to be advanced.

GDP growth for this year is forecast to be one-tenth of a percentage point above the official target of 6.5% and the same below in 2018 — ‘holding up’ despite considerable excess capacity remaining in the industrial sector. Consumption remains robust supported by housing-related purchases, e-commerce and overseas tourism.

While infrastructure investment is being sustained, monetary policy is tightening in response to the risk of financial instability, particularly via the shadow banking sector, and other risks that are mounting. Fiscal policy remains expansionary, however. The headline fiscal deficit will be held at 3% of GDP this year and next, the OECD reckons, but policy lending to prop up growth will also slow the rate of rebalancing.

That will also be slowed by the lack of reform, for example to the social safety net, that is diverting monies that individuals could spend on domestic consumption to precautionary savings. Longer term, the OECD says, corporate deleveraging and working off excess capacity “will be crucial to avoid a sharp slowdown in the future.”

It also quietly but firmly makes the point that longer the debt problem is left unaddressed, the larger it will get, and, by implication, the harder it will be to deal with it.

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Politics, Not Debt Will Drive The Deleveraging Of China’s SOEs

MOODY’S CREDIT DOWNGRADE of China caught the attention of the public prints, ever ready, in some quarters at least, to see the prophesied hard landing just around the corner, with the economy crumpling under the weight of an oncoming rush of bad debt. S&P did much the same as Moody’s back in March with much less general notice. In its commentary, Moody’s falls over itself to emphasise the long-term nature of the risk.

As this Bystander has argued before, while China’s debt-to-GDP ratio is large, and has grown in recent years, it remains manageable by Beijing, even in the event of a crisis, and the risk of external contagion is small.

That is not to say it is not of concern to policymakers. It is. It is concentrated in state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and local authorities. SOE debt, at 115% of GDP is concerning. (In Japan and South Korea state-owned corporate debt is about 30% of GDP). And the finance ministry has noted that some local authorities, caught between paying for shutting down loss-making state industries or subsidising them to keep them going, and no longer able to rely on land sales to square their books, are struggling to cover operating expenses.

All this is also a sign, widely commented on by the likes of the IMF, World Bank and the OECD, that the old-school means of state-led infrastructure investment to keep growth going are persisting to the detriment of ‘rebalancing’.  Those two points come together politically.

The political event of the year is, self-evidently, the Party plenum to be held later this year. This is no ordinary plenum, as it is the scene-setter for the next generation of leadership. President Xi Jinping’s legacy is at stake.

Vested interests lying in the way of economic reform have not been fully removed by the anti-corruption campaign. Many of those same interests would also end up on the wrong side of any aggressive debt resolution, given both the individual companies that would be involved and the structural reforms necessary to governance and financial markets.

So, for now, authorities are biding their time over the debt question. The economy has stabilised sufficiently to buy them a few more months of inaction; candidate Trump’s threatened trade war has been headed off; the razzmatazz around One Belt, One Road sustains hopes of new export markets for excess capacity.

Once Xi has consolidated his political control at the plenum, then the debt busters will start to move in.

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China’s First-Quarter GDP Growth Highlights Rebalancing Shortfalls

MORE UNRUFFLED WATERS for the Chinese economy–at least on the surface. First-quarter GDP growth, as reported by the National Bureau of Statistics, came in at 6.9% year-on-year.

That is its fastest pace in six quarters and the first back-to-back quarterly increase in GDP in seven years. The first-quarter number is also well in line with the 6.5% official annual growth target set last a month.

However, a closer look at the components of growth suggests that deeper currents swirl dangerously, and particularly that the old-school model of state investment-led growth still holds sway. Fixed asset investment in the first quarter, up 9.2%, was an acceleration from 2016’s 8.1% growth rate. Infrastructure investment rose by 23.5% while real estate development was up 9.1%. Industrial production also rose.

Worryingly for the rebalancing of the economy towards greater domestic consumption, retail sales growth slowed to 10% in the first quarter from 2016’s 10.4% expansion.

US President Donald Trump’s backing off from threatening a trade war with China because he needs Beijing’s cooperation in dealing with North Korea has provided breathing room for China’s economy, which it appears to be exploiting with some gusto.

The stimulus that Beijing has given the economy has led the International Monetary Fund to raise its forecasts for China’s growth this year and next in its latest World Economic Outlook to 6.6% and 6.2% respectively. That is 0.1 and 0.2 percentage points higher than its January forecasts and 0.4 and 0.2 percentage points higher than its October 2016 forecasts.

The question remains, however: how sustainable can this pace of growth be long-term without rebalancing taking more substantial hold and the problem of excess leverage being tackled?

As the IMF puts it:

The medium-term outlook, however, continues to be clouded by increasing resource misallocation and growing vulnerabilities associated with the reliance on near-term policy easing and credit-financed investment.

At some point, as prime minister Li Keqiang again emphasised, Beijing will have to switch growth gears. That will mean unwinding its most recent stimulus–very carefully. But that is unlikely to start happening until after President Xi Jinping has consolidated his political control at the critical Party plenum later this year.

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Li Lays Out China’s Economic Goals For The Year

CHINA HAS SET its growth target for this year at ‘around 6.5%’, prime minister Li Keqiang told the annual session of parliament. That is down from 2016’s goal of 6.5%-7% and the outcome of 6.7%.

The glide path to slower but more sustainable growth continues. However, it will be a more cautious approach this year ahead of an important party plenum later this year at which the scope of President Xi Jinping’s second term and eventually succession will be set.

China also faces a more uncertain external environment economy than any time since the 2008 global financial crisis, while the stimulus that staved off deflation last year has left the debt crisis still to be dealt with. While China is perfectly able to deal with that on a macro level, signs of local stress are increasingly apparent.  The finance ministry has again just warned of the ‘the hidden-debt risks of local governments’, especially in the rust belt in the Northeast.

Li’s signalled that the leadership considered 6.5% growth a floor, though if there is any suggestion of social or political instability (and especially instability within the political elites), that floor will, no doubt, be lowered.

Last year, 726,000 workers were shifted out of rust-belt industries; this year another 500,000 will follow, according to the labour minister. China created more than 13 million new jobs last year, according to the official figures, but a further half a million redundant iron and steel workers and coal miners is a lot to absorb, and especially in places where few new industries are flourishing.

Removing excess capacity from heavy industry has proved more difficult than planned as has killing off ‘zombie’ state-owned enterprises.

Rebalancing the economy has also progressed more slowly than Xi laid out when he assumed the leadership four years ago; one reason is that he has repeatedly turned to old-school stimulus whenever the economy looked to be slowing too rapidly.

The government will have work to do to reduce last year’s fiscal deficit of 3.8% of GDP to the wished-for 3.0% (which was also last year’s target).

Li set another ‘about’ target, of ‘about 12%’ for broadest measure of money supply (M2). While that is less than 2016’s target 13%, it is still above end-2016  money supply growth of 11.3%. More monetary policy tightening is likely, barring severe adverse external headwinds.

The military budget will again be restricted to a 7% increase (1.3% of GDP), even though US President Donald Trump has promised a 10% hike in the United States’ defence budget. The United States spends 3.3% of its GDP on defence.

Beijing’s holding fast after decades of double-digit growth will increase the already sizeable spending gap, $600-plus billion a year against $140 billion a year, though off-budget procurement could add a further $50 billion to China’s number and the modernisation of the PLA will continue.

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