Tag Archives: Hangzhou

Environmentalists’ Political Threat To China’s Communist Party

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTESTS ARE of even greater concern to the leadership of China’s Communist Party than the threat of domestic terrorism. For one, they are far more widespread. The violence that broke out on May 10th in Zhongtai, a township outside Hangzhou, at a demonstration against building a waste incinerator there, may have been untypically bloody, but such protests in themselves are far from uncommon. Tens of thousands occur every year across the country.

The annual numbers are rising at a marked rate as far as we can tell. Some like one last year against China National Petroleum Corp.’s plans to build a petrochemical plant in Kunming gain international attention, but most remain local affairs. Nor do most secure more than get a delay to the unwanted project. Last year’s cancellation of a proposed lithium battery factory in the Songjiang district of Shanghai following large-scale protests was an exception rather than the rule.

Nor can the authorities point at the finger of blame on outside agitators, as they can do with the recent knife and bomb attacks blamed on militants from Xinjiang — though this Bystander will not be surprised to see the 50-centers on social media and their equivalent official unofficial voices in the public prints doing just that with environmental protests. There is too large a slice of China’s middle class concerned about the environmental degradation that has come with economic development for authorities to crack down on them all. Surveys of public opinion suggest that three-fifths to three-quarters of the public want the government to do more to improve the environment, and particularly to lessen pollution.

There is nothing exclusively Chinese about demonstrations against development projects by those who don’t want them in their backyards regardless of the greater benefit to a broader society. Incinerating waste rather than burying it in landfills and using the energy created as an alternative to coal-burning power generation plants is net for net an environmental gain for Hangzhou and the rest of the eastern China seaboard. Zhongtai residents are more narrowly concerned that what would be Asia largest incineration plant will further pollute their air and contaminate their water.

For the leadership, the long-term threat is that environmental protests will be the kernel form which a political party could grow to challenge the Party’s monopoly on political power. That is one reason it has allowed so many environmental protests to proceed for as long as they remain relatively local and peaceful.  Indeed, thousands of residents have been protesting against the planned incineration plant in Zhongtai for the past couple of weeks.

What the leadership will not tolerate is attacks on symbols of national authority such as police. That puts it on a slippery slope. Throwing a dragnet over the Zhongtai in a search for 15 men suspected of involvement in Saturday’s violent clashes with riot police is meant to show that the leadership will tolerate only so much dissent — and that that has to remain local and disorganized.

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Shanghai Becomes More Like Venice, In A Bad Way

So serious has the depletion of China’s groundwater become as a result of industrialization and urbanization that the country’s large cities are sinking, as, potentially, are the high-speed rail corridors between them. So concerning is that to authorities that the State Council has made areas with high-speed rail links a priority in a new land subsidence research project it has approved to be completed by 2015. In the order of these things, that is a crash deadline.

The survey is one of four projects that the Ministry of Land and Resources said this week that the State Council had ratified to combat the effects of China’s growing water shortage. Others include yet more controls on pumping underground water, and the setting up of monitoring networks in the worst affected areas–the Yangtze river delta, the North China Plain and the Fen and Hua river basins. The network is to be in place by 2020.

It didn’t take any technology to see the 8 meter crack that opened up earlier this month in a road near the Shanghai World Financial Center. (There are some pictures here.) That is despite authorities taking preventive measures since 2005 to combat ground subsidence caused by falling water tables. Municipal officials say the city is still sinking by seven millimeters a year. That is a better state of affairs than in the past, however. Shanghai used to be sinking by several centimeters a year.

A third of China’s water reserves lie in underground aquifers. They supply 70% of the country’s drinking water and 40% of its farm irrigation needs. They are being stretched to their limits, particularly across the grain belt of the North China Plain as evermore wells are sunk to draw water for city dwellers and industry. Underground water pollution is a separate concern, but as serious.

Shanghai is one of more than 50 large cities with a similar Venice-like problem of subsidence because the water table below it is sinking. Beijing, Tianjin, Hangzhou and Xian are among others. As the number of 50 cities has been quoted since at least 2006, we suspect it may undercount the problem today. In a paper the China Geological Survey published that year the direct economic cost of subsidence was put at 1 billion yuan ($160 million) a year. It will likely top that now.

Tianjin, which like Shanghai has been sinking since the 1920s although it wasn’t until the 1960s that it was understood why, shows why widespread limits on groundwater pumping are so urgent, and also how difficult it is to control subsidence. The city introduced restrictions as long ago as 1985. Its sinking has slowed from 80 millimeters a year then but is still dropping 20 millimeters a year now. Coastal cities share another characteristic with Venice. Floods are becoming more frequent and severe. The lower cities sink the more susceptible they are to them.

We have noted before the potential explosive social costs of a water crisis getting beyond the government’s control. It will take a comprehensive program of water conservation, better water resource management and better husbandry of the ecosystem. And there are plans on all those fronts. But if they fail, it will be more than a high-speed train or two that comes off the rails.

 

 

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When Beijing Betters London And Shanghai LA

A McKinsey Global Institute ranking of the world's top 50 cities by GDP in 2005

By 2025, Shanghai and Beijing will have higher GDPs than Los Angeles and London, a further sign of the world’s eastwards economic shift. The prediction comes from the McKinsey Global Institute, the economic research arm of McKinsey & Co., the international consultancy firm, which has been working on mapping the changing economic power of the world’s metropolitan areas, and is recirculating some work on this it first released in March. Shanghai is already among the world’s top 50 cities ranked by GDP, but as well a Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Foshan, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Nanjing, Shenyang, Shenzhen, Tianjin, Wuhan and Xian will all join it by 2025, McKinsey predicts. European cities will be most numerous among the dropouts, but another will be Taipei.

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Stimulus Ideas To Reject

So here’s a tapioca idea. Hangzhou local officials are to have 5%-10% of their wages paid in shopping coupons. These can be exchange for locally made goods. The coupons may also be given to the poor and the unemployed.

“We have not achieved any results yet,” Shou Xuejun, an official with a local financial bureau, told China Daily.

Quite.

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