Tag Archives: GDP growth

Powering Up Rebalancing

Bar chart of electric power consumption in China by sector, Jan-May, 2018, year-on-year % increase.

ELECTRIC POWER CONSUMPTION acts as a proxy for economic activity. These sectoral figures from the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) for the first five months of this year give a snapshot of where the growth is strongest, and points up how the economy is rebalancing.

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IMF Sees China’s Economy With Momentum To Face Headwinds

IN ITS LATEST World Economic Outlook, the International Monetary Fund has left its forecast for China’s growth this year and next unchanged from January’s 6.6% and 6.4% respectively.

Both numbers are one-tenth of a percentage point higher than the Fund’s forecast in October last year. They are also in line with the most recent forecasts from the World Bank and the OECD.

Faster than expected global growth and domestic policy support has sustained the economy in the form of resurgent net exports and healthy private consumption, giving it some momentum to propel it into the challenging headwinds of America First protectionism and still-risky domestic overleverage.

Thereafter, the IMF provides a familiar refrain:

Over the medium term, the economy is projected to continue rebalancing away from investment toward private consumption and from industry to services, but nonfinancial debt is expected to continue rising as a share of GDP, and the accumulation of vulnerabilities clouds the medium-term outlook.

And its obligatory silver lining:

Tighter regulation of nonbank intermediation in China, where nonfinancial corporate sector debt is still rising, is a welcome start of a needed policy response to contain the accumulation of vulnerabilities.

But it also highlights a missed opportunity:

Fiscal policy has played a vital part in shoring up short-term growth at the expense of eroding valuable policy space. Gradual consolidation, together with a shift of spending back onto the budget and away from off-budget channels, would help improve sustainability.

The Fund’s accompanying Global Financial Stability Report goes into greater depth about the elevated risks posed by what it says is the large-scale, tight and opaque linking of the banking system to the shadow banking sector (see diagram below) through its exposure to off-balance-sheet investment vehicles largely funded through the issuance of some 75 trillion yuan ($12 trillion) of investment products.

One-third of those by value are directly managed by the banks, who are seen as implicitly guaranteeing the products. A key challenge for authorities will be phasing out those implicit guarantees, which will require banks to improve their liquidity and capital buffers as there are large maturity mismatches between the products’ assets and liabilities.

Diagram of linkages within China's financial system. Credit: IMF Global Stability Report, April 2018

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OECD Raises China Growth Forecast And Risks To It

THE OECD HAS edged up its growth forecast for China this year to 6.7% from the 6.6% it projected in November but holds its 2019 forecast unchanged at 6.4%. The revised numbers are contained in the newly published interim Economic Outlook from the rich countries’ think tank.

Overall, the OECD sees a steady or improving expansion across most G20 economies thanks to the bounce back of trade and private investment, with fiscal stimulus in the United States and Germany providing a boost to short-term growth, while inflationary pressures are subdued. Specifically, on China it says

Growth surprised on the upside in China in 2017, helped by a strong rebound in exports, but is set to soften to just below 6½ per cent by 2019. Macroeconomic and regulatory policies are gradually becoming more restrictive, the working age population is now declining and credit conditions are less expansionary. Regulatory efforts are continuing to reduce financial risks, deal with overcapacity in some sectors and improve environmental quality. Fiscal policy is now broadly neutral, but additional measures could be implemented if output growth were to slow more sharply.

However, the risks to its general forecast all threaten particular vulnerabilities of the Chinese economy: tightening monetary policy in the advanced economies, high debt and asset valuations, and a potentially damaging escalation of trade tensions.

The importance of tackling high debt levels is illustrated in this chart.

Chart of G20 total debt, public and private non-financial sector, as % of GDP, 2001-2017. Source: OECD

The OECD calls on Beijing for policy initiatives to reduce the high level of corporate debt, in particular.

The OECD also makes a point of the importance of safeguarding the rules-based international trading system. China has repeatedly been saying the same thing, if somewhat self-servingly and with itself as the guarantor, since long before the Trump administration announced import tariffs on steel and aluminium. It is likely to echo the call again as the United States readies a Section 301 action on intellectual property rights and technology transfer practices aimed at what the US president has flatly called China’s theft of US technology.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration has reportedly told Beijing that it has to come up with a plan to reduce China’s $375 billion trade surplus with the United States by $100 billion within a year.

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Steady GDP Growth Target Reflects Measured Derisking

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang delivers his work report at the first session of the 13th National People's Congress in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, March 5, 2018. Photo credit: Xinhua.

THE OFFICIAL GDP growth target for 2018 is ‘around 6.5%’, the same as last year, when the outcome was a forecast 6.9%, Prime Minister Li Keqiang (above) told the National Peoples Congress in his annual work report. However, the aspirational text from last year on the upside of the target has been dropped for this.

More significantly, the deficit target has been cut for the first time since 2012, to 2.6% of GDP from 3.0%, and monetary policy is to remain neutral, suggesting a tightening of the fiscal screw as authorities’ preferred way to de-risk the financial system.

If the 6.5% growth target is hit, China will be comfortably on course to achieve the goal set in 2010 of doubling per capita GDP by 2020 and thus making it a ‘moderately well-off society’. Growth needs to average only 6.3% between 2018 and 2020 for the target to be achieved.

Less certain is the extent to which quality of growth will replace quantity, as advertised at October’s quinquennial Party Congress. Li repeated the intention to reduce debt-fuelled investment, pollution, poverty and industrial overcapacity, in line with the Party line, but a 6.5% growth target would imply more economic stimulus or less fiscal drag than might otherwise be expected under the managed long-term slowdown and rebalancing of the economy.

That continues incrementally. He Lifeng, head of the National Development and Reform Commission, said on the sidelines of the NPC that consumption is likely to contribute around 60% to economic growth in 2018, up from 58.8% last year and barely 56% five years ago.

He also identified plate glass, cement and electrolytic aluminium as among the next round of target industries for capacity cuts.

The new GDP growth target also implies that the pace of structural financial reform will remain cautious, as it has been for some time. Deleveraging via cracking down on corporations, as happened to Anbang and more recently CEFC China Energy, will continue to be a way of removing excess financial risk from the system while serving the twin goal of aligning private sector foreign direct investment with the national interest.

Similarly, on the debt issue, Finance Minister Xiao Jie indicates that administrative action will be taken against irregularities in local government financing. Local governments account for 55% of the combined debt of central and local governments of  29.95 trillion yuan ($4.75 trillion) at the end of last year.

While some progress has been made on both reducing local government debt levels and structural reforms to local government financing, local governments remain overly dependent on land sales, with the concomitant risk of abuse.

However, a trade war, depending on its severity and duration, might make all that moot.

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China’s Economy: Normal Slowing Will Resume in 2018

THE ECONOMY STORMED along in the second half of last year, taking growth for the year to 6.9%, comfortably outstripping the official target of ‘around 6.5%’.

It was riding the coattails of the fiscal stimulus introduced in the first half of the year and also the pick-up in global trade, partly helped by the robust growth in the United States and some recovery in Europe, which boosted China’s exports. At 8.7% of China’s GDP growth, net export volumes made their largest contribution to growth since 2008.

Policymakers have been managing a slowdown from the giddy decades of double-digit growth. The overall lesson from last week’s figures is that economy is fitfully rebalancing and that there was some slowdown in credit growth as official efforts to cool the property market, deleverage and upgrade industrial capacity gained some traction.

That last year turned out to be the first acceleration since 2010 should prove to be an anomaly. Normal slowing will resume this year. And especially if policymakers push ahead with measures to control financial risks.

The most recent forecast from the World Bank, which recently upped its estimate of GDP growth in 2017 to 6.8% (a 0.3 percentage point increase from its forecast a year ago and reiterated in June) says it expects 6.4% growth this year (a 0.1 percentage point increase from its previous number).

Beijing has plenty of headroom in meeting its 2010 target of doubling aggregate and per capita growth by 2020. The economy needs to average no more than 6.3% growth to achieve that.

That headroom will also let Beijing tackle its most pressing economic-related problems: curbing escalating debt; cutting excess heavy industrial capacity; becoming environmentally cleaner; and dealing with the risk of unemployment as the economy is rebalanced towards domestic consumption and higher-value-added manufacturing.

Where the margins of safety are considerably thinner is if there is a trade war with the United States.

As we noted recently, US President Donald Trump is itching to impose tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminium imports into the United States. More recently Washington has said that an investigation into intellectual property transfers to China has been launched, with Trump warning that China is in for “a very big intellectual property fine”.

His self-restraint because he needs Beijing’s help with North Korea is wearing thin. Nor will it have been helped by the revelation that an ex-CIA officer arrested in New York this week may have been the mole responsible for passing information to Chinese intelligence that led to the dismantling and death of the CIA’s intelligence network in China between 2010 and 2012.

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World Bank Ups Its Prospects For China’s Economy

THE WORLD BANK has become more bullish on China, at least for the near-term. In its newly published annual Global Economic Prospects, it has upped its estimate of GDP growth in 2017 to 6.8% (an 0.3 percentage point increase from its forecast a year ago and reiterated in June) and said it expects 6.4% growth this year (an 0.1 percentage point increase from its previous number).

China benefited, the Bank now says, from the recovery in world trade last year, fiscal stimulus and the rebalancing of the economy, which eased the drivers of the economy away from state-led investment. Inflation rose but was still within target and housing price increases moderated in response to policy measures.

The current account surplus continued to narrow, but the clampdown on capital outflows meant that exchange-rate pressures eased and foreign-exchange reserves recovered modestly.

On the flip side, non-financial sector debt continued to grow, reaching 260% of GDP, regardless of further monetary and regulatory tightening. Credit growth still outpaces nominal GDP growth.

The Bank says that financial sector vulnerabilities — particularly high corporate indebtedness in sectors with overcapacity and deteriorating profitability — are one of the key downside risks to growth.

Others include the possibility of protectionist policies in advanced economies (for which read the United States) and rising geopolitical tensions (for which read mainly North Korea).

The Bank also expects the economy to continue its measured deceleration, averaging 6.3% growth in 2019 and 2020, and less beyond that as adverse demographics kick in over the next decade.

A steeper-than-expected slowdown or debt- or geopolitical-driven financial stress would have impacts well beyond China’s borders.

The Bank’s view is that authorities have substantial ‘policy buffers’ to absorb financial shocks. Nonetheless, it, like others, calls for further structural reform to reallocate economic activity towards more productive sectors.

This would include financial and corporate sector reform as well as greater efforts to deleverage and improve the fiscal sustainability of provincial, municipal and local government.

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IMF Again Warns China Off Growth For Growth’s Sake

THE IMF’S NEWLY published World Economic Outlook projects a 0.1 percentage point increase in GDP growth this year over last, to 6.8%. That is an upward revision of 0.1 percentage point to its July forecast, based on policy easing and stimulus to domestic demand earlier in the year.

However, the Fund sees the glide path of managed slowing growth resuming next year, with GDP growth forecast at 6.5% in 2018 (again up 0.1 percentage point from July’s forecast, and up 0.2 percentage points from its April forecast) and thereafter slowing further to 5.8% by 2022.

By that point, the IMF expects China to be growing more slowly than the emerging and developing Asia average, forecast at 6.3%. That would a phenomenon not seen since China started its double-digit growth spurt.

That, in its way, would be a mark of success for the rebalancing of the economy towards being more consumption-driven and less dependent for growth on infrastructure investment and exports. The IMF is projecting that China’s current account balance will have shrunk to $28.8 billion by 2022, against $196.4 billion last year, and almost one-tenth of the level it was a decade ago. As a percentage of GDP, the effect will be even more dramatic: a projected 0.2% in 2022 against 4.7% in 2009.

All neat projections, but realizing them is not without risk, most notably in managing debt:

Over the medium term, dealing with financial sector challenges will be essential. Minimizing the risk of a sharp slowdown in China will require the Chinese authorities to intensify their efforts to rein in the credit expansion.

The conundrum is that 6%-plus growth is necessary for China to have met its target of doubling real GDP between 2010 and 2020. To make sure it does, Beijing will be in no hurry to withdraw its stimulus.

However, as this Bystander and others have noted before, delay comes at the cost of further increases in debt, making the issue more difficult to resolve through the necessary measures of tighter supervision, reined-in expansion of credit and writes down of the underlying stock of bad assets.

This, in turn, would slow rebalancing and reduce the policy space available to respond in case of an abrupt shock to the system, internal or external.

Such shocks are not difficult to imagine, and are detailed by the Fund:

a funding shock in the short-term interbank market or the funding market for wealth-management products; the imposition of trade barriers by trading partners; or a return of capital outflow pressures because of a faster-than-expected normalisation of US interest rates.

The political dimension to this, unaddressed by the IMF, not surprisingly given its sensitivity, is whether President Xi Jinping will emerge from next week’s Party Congress in a sufficiently strong position to be able deemphasize near-term growth targets and implement more reforms that would enhance the sustainability of growth. Without doing so, he will be unable achieve his long-term goal of maintaining the Party’s monopoly grip on power while transforming China’s economy to its next phase of development.

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