Tag Archives: financial markets

Putting Financial Stability Ahead Of Growth

IN THE SIX years since the International Monetary Fund last published a Financial System Stability Assessment of China, credit has boomed, spreading shadow banking has added complexity to the system, and moral hazard has grown as belief in the implicit state guarantee to firms and investors has remained unshakeable.

In short, financial instability risks have grown rapidly.

Within the constraint of maintaining growth and employment, authorities have responded to mitigate the risk and to put the expanding financial system on the right footing to support the ‘rebalancing’ of the economy from being led by infrastructure investment and export manufacturing to being more consumption and service driven.

There is much more to do, however, as the Fund outlines in its latest assessment.

Some of that will be politically challenging, notably allowing firms to fail, markets to fall and investors to lose money, which will be the consequences of removing the implicit guarantee that the state stands behind financial loans and products. They will also require detailed technical work on bankruptcy procedures, financial education and even social security safety nets.

Political priorities will also need to be adjusted to put financial stability ahead of economic growth. That is already starting to happen as job losses, particularly in heavy industry and primary production, and slowing economic growth more generally shows. However, the tolerance for both is greater at the higher levels of government than at the local one, where the expectation among officials that promotion depends on creating good economic growth numbers is proving hard to break. The massive task of reforming local government finances is probably a multi-decade, not just multi-year endeavour.

China Financial System Growth

Improving the supervision of the financial sector is an easier piece to bite off, and authorities have been systematically expanding that for banks, insurance companies and securities firms in recent years. The Fund recommends setting up an umbrella regulator focusing solely on financial stability to coordinate the oversight of systemic risk across sectors.

This regulator, which would be an institutional version of the recently established Financial Stability and Development Committee, will need authority and independence over the sector supervisors and an improved flow of data given the scale and complexity of the country’s financial system, especially in some of the murkier areas of shadow banking. As was seen in the West with the 2008 financial crisis, failure to monitor risks outside the regulatory perimeter can be the most damaging failure of all.

The Fund also suggests that the well-advertised rapid growth of debt requires banks to hold a plumper cushion of capital, and particularly at the larger banks that are systemically important. Greater capital reserves would not only provide a buffer in the event of a sudden or severe economic downturn, but also against the particular risk with Chinese characteristics of the extensive off-balance-sheet borrowing, notably for wealth management products, that the banks implicitly guarantee.

In the same vein, banks and financial institutions should be nudged through lending rules to stop using short-term borrowing to finance their investments and instead both lend and fund longer-term. Should it come to it, and a financial institution goes under, regulators should have their powers expanded in line with international standards to let the firm to ‘fail safely’ rather than prop it up with public funds.

Another area that the Fund urges oversight is digital finance, or fintech, which as expanded significantly in China as elsewhere. Existing oversight frameworks are often ill-fitting for the innovation that comes with fintech, though the need for systemic safety and soundness is not diminished.

The Fund calls China ‘the global centre of fintech’, noting the growth of peer-to-peer lending and the emergence of payment systems run by internet retailers such as Alibaba that are competitors to the banks’. Smartphone app WeChat’s WeBank is already a competitor to banks’ lending.

The scale of this is still small compared to the overall size of the banking system and thus not a systemic risk — yet. Nonetheless, they will need to be brought into the regulatory and supervisory scheme of things. This is starting to happen following the State Council last year launching an overhaul of internet finance oversight.

 

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China Can Now Rattle Global Markets With The Best Of Them

Shanghai Stock Exchange seen in 2009. Photo credit: Aaron Goodman. Licenced under Creative Commons.

BOTH LAST YEAR and early this, global stock markets were fazed by a sharp fall in prices on the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges. Chinese equity and currency movements are having an increasing impact on investors everywhere. A new working paper published by the Bank for International Settlements, ‘the central bankers’ central bank’, suggests that China’s influence in this regards is rising to the level of that of the United States in some circumstances.

Market moves in China no longer reverberate just in Asia, the authors argue. However, the growth of financial and economic linkages within Asia raise questions about the pace and extent of financial market spillovers in the region and whether there are substantive differences in those flowing out of China to those from the United States.

Empirical study is only starting in this area, though the anecdotal evidence of the effects of financial market shocks is growing steadily. Chang Shu and her colleagues in the bank’s Monetary and Economic Department conclude that China’s influence in this regard has been growing significantly in recent years. This is especially true of equity and currency movements, as increasing financial linkages supplement extensive trade ones established by China’s central position in Asian supply chains.

A working paper from the IMF published last month came to a similar conclusion.

However, that has not diminished the importance of the United States, which also has impact across all asset classes including bonds, and particularly at times of market stress. China’s global financial linkages, though growing, remain modest compared to the United States’ not least because China’s capital account is not fully liberalised. Chinese monetary policy is nowhere near as potent a driver of global liquidity as the US Federal Reserve’s.

For investors, the implication of the work is that diversification of portfolios through Asia investment is becoming less effective at mitigating risk because Asian market movements are now driven by external factors to a greater degree than before.

For regional policymakers, the findings pose the challenge that yield-seeking capital flows to their country (and their exit) will be driven by developments in both Chinese and US financial markets, often in a mutually reinforcing way that could undermine macroeconomic and financial stability in vulnerable economies. It will likely take the emergence of intraregional institutional investors to weaken that linkage.

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China’s Financial Reform: ‘Making Progress While Maintaining Stability’

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao (front) attends the National Financial Work Conference in Beijing, Jan. 7, 2012. (Xinhua Photo)

There were no great expectations of the fourth quinquennial national financial work conference that has just ended in Beijing. And it seems to have met them.

These two-day meetings set broad policy objectives for the coming five years. In the past they have provided a blueprint for significant financial-system reform. But with a leadership transition already underway, the start of a new five-year plan and growing nervousness among policymakers and political leaders about the volatile outlook for the global economy and the potential implications for China’s growth, there is no great appetite for much beyond keeping a steady ship.

“Risk-aversion should be the lifeline of our financial work,” said Prime Minister Wen Jiabao, seen in the Xinhua photo above arriving for the start of meeting with the men and woman in whose hands so much rests. Wen also said that there would be greater supervision of the banks, which, he said needed to improve their governance and risk management.

Risk control and prudent macroeconomic management were the order of the day, as they were at last month’s annual economic work meeting. “Making progress while maintaining stability,” is the mantra. The emphasis is currently on the stability.

More detail about the financial work meeting will likely drip out over the coming days. The post-meeting statement dealt in generalities, but two leading topics of discussion were the currency and interest rates. Moves towards more market oriented interest rate mechanisms are necessary if China is to become more efficient at capital allocation, as it needs to be as its economy develops from its invest and export model of the past three decades. But steps have been tentative in the face of some vested interests who have thrived on cheap and ready bank loans. We expect the equally tentative steps to develop bond markets to be given priority over interest rate liberalization, with provincial and local governments being given more scope to sell bonds to firm up their finances. However, when it comes to developing a corporate bond market, don’t underestimate the political task in getting the big state owned enterprises to be supportive of a new source of credit that will be more demanding of their performance.

The internationalization of the yuan is also likely to continue at a measured pace, while the exchange rate against the dollar won’t be allowed to drift much higher. Policymakers feel that with the trade surplus shrinking the currency is at the right sort of level. It has risen by a third since the peg with the U.S. dollar was first broken seven years ago. Wen said China “will steadily proceed with efforts to make the renminbi convertible under capital account to improve its management of the foreign-exchange reserves”–though that is pretty much boilerplate.

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Will China’s Rich Change The Global Art Market?

China has displaced the U.K. to become the world’s second largest art market after the U.S., according to a report on the global art market in 2010 commissioned by the European Fine Art Foundation and published to coincide with its Maastricht arts and antiques fair, the art dealing world’s annual trade show that opens at the end of this week. Given the pace of economic growth that China has enjoyed in recent years, regardless of the global financial crisis in 2008 (when China displaced France as the third largest art market), and the consequent growth of a cadre of newly rich potential purchasers, that is perhaps no great surprise.  Something similar happened in Japan at its equivalent phase of growth in the 1980s. Older hands will remember Yasuo Goto of the Yasuda Fire and Marine Insurance Company paying $40 million at auction for a Van Gogh in 1987, a price that more than tripled the then world record for a work of art.

What intrigues us is whether the scale of China’s newly rich buying art will turn fine art into a structured alternative-investment category in a way that Japan didn’t. China has taken a tentative first step in this direction. In January, it set up the government-backed Tianjin Cultural Artwork Exchange to let investors buy and sell fractional ownership of paintings, calligraphy and other works of art — and so provide a rudimentary public market where investors, small and large, could, in effect, trade art shares.

What it and a similar exchange in France don’t let an investor do is invest in the broad art market or in an index of it. The art world doesn’t have an investment-grade index equivalent to a broad stock market index. Constructing one would be even more difficult than creating real-estate indices, which also have to contend with the issue of measuring a market of one-off products, properties in its case, works of art in the other; further, though art sales are an estimated $30 billion a year market, less than half of that is comprised of discoverable prices, i.e. sales at auction; three-fifths to two-thirds are private sales. Could Chinese buying provide the impetus for tackling those structural market problems? Or will it just create another bubbly fad that will eventually go pop?

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