Options Narrow For A China-US Trade Deal

SUMMITS ARE FOR signings. US President Donald Trump’s second summit meeting with North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un in Hanoi should never have taken place. Or at least not until after officials had worked out what the agreement between the two countries was going to be. President Xi Jinping is not prepared to put himself at risk of the sort of fall-out that followed Trump walking out on Kim and that summit ending prematurely with no agreement.

The presidents meeting at Trump’s Florida resort Mar-a-Lago pencilled in for the end of this month to sign-off on a China-US trade agreement remains no firmer that, with Terry Branstad, the US ambassador in Beijing confirming to the Wall Street Journal that a date had not been finalised. The boosterish talk a couple of weeks back that a deal was near enough to completion to suspend the introduction on March 1st of 25% US tariffs on $200-billion-worth of Chinese exports is heard no more.

The sticking points of the agreement are proving as intractable as this Bystander has suspected all along that they would be, particularly over state subsidies, market access and forced technology transfers. No country readily changes its economic development model without either good cause or great pressure.

However, even the mechanism for monitoring and enforcing an agreed timetable for China to remove tariffs is proving difficult to nail down, as is getting the US side to agree to a schedule to withdraw its tariffs. The enforcement mechanism must be “two way, fair and equal,” Vice Commerce Minister Wang Shouwen said this weekend.

The US president is pushing for an early conclusion to a deal for political reasons. He needs demonstrable benefits from it to take into his 2020 re-election campaign. Xi also needs a deal that avoids him looking as if he has come off second best to the United States or has done anything to exacerbate the current slowdown in the economy.

For both, a narrow trade deal with enforcement mechanisms around only tariff-removal regimes seems more and more likely. Beyond that, Beijing will agree to buy more US produce and industrial goods and codify economic reforms that it is already planning to introduce. The more significant structural issues will be kicked down the road.

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Filed under China-U.S., Trade

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