Trade Tension And A Less Certain Outlook Cloud China’s Economy

THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND has held its growth projections for China unchanged even as it warned of growing downside risks to the global outlook.

The newly published July update to its World Economic Outlook puts its forecast GDP growth at 6.6% for this year and 6.4% for next. It cites softening world demand and regulatory and financial tightening as the reasons why.

The Fund’s forecast is in line with official figures for the second quarter released today by the the National Bureau of Statistics showing the economy growing by 6.7% year-on-year in the second quarter, the twelfth consecutive quarter of 6.7-6.9% growth.

Rebalancing, evidenced by private and public consumption contributing a record 78.5% of January-June GDP growth, continues as does excess-capacity reduction; mining sector output grew by at less than a quarter of the pace of overall industrial output.

Net export volumes shaved 0.7 of a percentage point off first-half growth as exporters and importers raced to beat the imposition of US tariffs. The effect of those are likely to be felt more severely in the second half of this year.

For its part, the IMF notes:

The recently announced and anticipated tariff increases by the United States and retaliatory measures by trading partners have increased the likelihood of escalating and sustained trade actions. These could derail the recovery and depress medium-term growth prospects, both through their direct impact on resource allocation and productivity and by raising uncertainty and taking a toll on investment.

To trade tensions, the Fund adds rising US interest rates and commodity prices, notably oil, as among the most concerning downside risks to the global economy.

The Fund’s prescription that ‘avoiding protectionist measures and finding a cooperative solution that promotes continued growth in goods and services trade remain essential to preserve the global expansion’ may find more resonance in Beijing that Washington these days, as will its call to preserve global economic integration under an open, rules-based multilateral trade system.

Leave a comment

Filed under Economy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s