China’s Economy: Normal Slowing Will Resume in 2018

THE ECONOMY STORMED along in the second half of last year, taking growth for the year to 6.9%, comfortably outstripping the official target of ‘around 6.5%’.

It was riding the coattails of the fiscal stimulus introduced in the first half of the year and also the pick-up in global trade, partly helped by the robust growth in the United States and some recovery in Europe, which boosted China’s exports. At 8.7% of China’s GDP growth, net export volumes made their largest contribution to growth since 2008.

Policymakers have been managing a slowdown from the giddy decades of double-digit growth. The overall lesson from last week’s figures is that economy is fitfully rebalancing and that there was some slowdown in credit growth as official efforts to cool the property market, deleverage and upgrade industrial capacity gained some traction.

That last year turned out to be the first acceleration since 2010 should prove to be an anomaly. Normal slowing will resume this year. And especially if policymakers push ahead with measures to control financial risks.

The most recent forecast from the World Bank, which recently upped its estimate of GDP growth in 2017 to 6.8% (a 0.3 percentage point increase from its forecast a year ago and reiterated in June) says it expects 6.4% growth this year (a 0.1 percentage point increase from its previous number).

Beijing has plenty of headroom in meeting its 2010 target of doubling aggregate and per capita growth by 2020. The economy needs to average no more than 6.3% growth to achieve that.

That headroom will also let Beijing tackle its most pressing economic-related problems: curbing escalating debt; cutting excess heavy industrial capacity; becoming environmentally cleaner; and dealing with the risk of unemployment as the economy is rebalanced towards domestic consumption and higher-value-added manufacturing.

Where the margins of safety are considerably thinner is if there is a trade war with the United States.

As we noted recently, US President Donald Trump is itching to impose tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminium imports into the United States. More recently Washington has said that an investigation into intellectual property transfers to China has been launched, with Trump warning that China is in for “a very big intellectual property fine”.

His self-restraint because he needs Beijing’s help with North Korea is wearing thin. Nor will it have been helped by the revelation that an ex-CIA officer arrested in New York this week may have been the mole responsible for passing information to Chinese intelligence that led to the dismantling and death of the CIA’s intelligence network in China between 2010 and 2012.

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Filed under China-U.S., Economy, Trade

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