OECD Sees China’s Economy Stabilising But Reform Still Needed

THE OECD QUIETLY prides itself on being the grown-up economic forecaster, eschewing the flash and razzmatazz of the International Monetary Fund or the World Bank for an understated mix of solid economic analysis and policy prescription.

The chapter on China in its latest Economic Outlook fits the bill to a tee: a sparse summary of an economy that is stabilising thanks to earlier policy support, but still needing structural reform if ‘rebalancing’ is to be advanced.

GDP growth for this year is forecast to be one-tenth of a percentage point above the official target of 6.5% and the same below in 2018 — ‘holding up’ despite considerable excess capacity remaining in the industrial sector. Consumption remains robust supported by housing-related purchases, e-commerce and overseas tourism.

While infrastructure investment is being sustained, monetary policy is tightening in response to the risk of financial instability, particularly via the shadow banking sector, and other risks that are mounting. Fiscal policy remains expansionary, however. The headline fiscal deficit will be held at 3% of GDP this year and next, the OECD reckons, but policy lending to prop up growth will also slow the rate of rebalancing.

That will also be slowed by the lack of reform, for example to the social safety net, that is diverting monies that individuals could spend on domestic consumption to precautionary savings. Longer term, the OECD says, corporate deleveraging and working off excess capacity “will be crucial to avoid a sharp slowdown in the future.”

It also quietly but firmly makes the point that longer the debt problem is left unaddressed, the larger it will get, and, by implication, the harder it will be to deal with it.

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