The Core Of The Matter

CPC General Secretary Xi Jinping (centre) and other Politburo Standing Committee members seen at the Sixth Plenum held in Beijing, October 24 to 27.THE SIXTH PARTY plenum just concluded puts General Secretary Xi Jinping (above, centre) at the core of the leadership.

All party members should ‘closely unite around the Central Committee with Comrade Xi Jinping as the core’, said the the communique issued after the four-day behind-closed-doors meeting of the Party’s 400 top officials. Thereby, Xi enters a leadership pantheon comprising Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin and the benchmark for all such Party leaders, Mao Zedong — though it was Deng who first articulated the term when designating Jiang as his successor in 1989.

Thus elevated, Xi has reinforced his authority over the party, potentially allowing him to extend his dominance for years to come. Another five years as General Secretary, along with his other two jobs as President and head of the People’s Liberation, now seems a given.

The Sixth Plenum decided that a Party Congress  — the quinquennial meeting of the Party’s top 2,000 members — would be held in the second half of next year. That is the forum for appointing the new top leadership for the next five years. Under current Party rules, all but Xi and Prime Minister Li Keqiang among the seven-strong Politburo Standing Committee, the apex of power, will have to retire on the grounds of age, opening the way for Xi to pack it with his proteges.

From the new appointees will come the leadership through which Xi will exert his power after his retirement, assuming he does not flout the convention of stepping aside after two five-year terms to stay in office as well as power.

Xi’s authority is far from absolute, which gives the plenum’s other important decisions — the adoption of strict rules of Party discipline that apply at all levels and revised codes of intra-party political life — their significance.

Xi has been steadily consolidating his power through his anti-corruption campaign and by centring the leadership’s decision making in areas such as military reform, security and the economy on central committees that he controls. This in part is because systemic corruption at the local level has frustrated his plans for ‘rebalancing’ the economy that he sees as essential for maintaining the Party’s ability to retain its monopoly grasp on political power.

However much power at the top concentrates in the general secretary, Xi cannot avoid the fact that China’s social stability depends on maintaining a delicate balance between the top-down authority of the central leadership and the bottom-up legitimacy of local governance.

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