China Gets Its UK Nuclear Prize, Probably

THE UNITED KINGDOM’S decision to go-ahead with three nuclear power plants, the first at Hinkley Point, has had a somewhat surprisingly gruff welcome from state media.

Shortly after taking office in July, UK Prime Minister Theresa May ordered a second look at the projects, which were approved by the previous administration. This was to include cost and environmental concerns but also a security review of China’s involvement, which includes part-financing new reactors at Hinkley Point and Sizewell, both to be built and operated by France’s EDF, but also leading the construction and operation of a reactor at Bradwell to indigenous Chinese designs.

“However, in spite of the approval, China-phobia sentiments continue to hover and could possibly introduce more troubles as construction of the project gets underway, a Xinhua commentary thundered. “It is reported that while announcing the go-ahead, Theresa May has also promised ‘significant new safeguards’ to make sure that investment from China does not threaten national security. Of course, the British leader’s misgivings make little sense.”

The new safeguards give the British government a veto over sales of full or partial ownership of the reactors both while they are being built and then operated, and institutes national security reviews for future critical infrastructure projects, a practice that is common in most large economies, including China.

There had been dire warnings from the Chinese side when May announced her review that abandoning the projects would end the ‘golden era’ of Sino-British relations championed by her predecessor David Cameron and his finance minister, George Osborne.

“Let us hope that London quits its China-phobia and works with Beijing to ensure the project’s smooth development, Xinhua’s commentary continued.

Its testiness underlines the uncertainties that still surround the projects. China is desperate that Bradwell goes ahead to give it a key early sale to a developed nation of its still untried Hualong One reactor. Beijing hopes that will lead the way to a global export market for what a senior official at China General Nuclear Power estimates will be some 200 nuclear power plants.

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Filed under China-U.K., Economy, Energy

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