Details Emerge Of China’s New Privately-Owned Banks

DETAILS ARE SEEPING out about the pilot programme announced in January to establish a handful of new private banks this year. These are intended as a first step towards providing competition to China’s giant state-owned banks and an alternative to the shadow banking system for small businesses in need of mainstream banking services.

Earlier this week, Caixin quoted a China Banking Regulatory Commission official outlining arrangements that paired some deep-pocketed investors, including internet company Alibaba, which operates China’s largest e-payment service, Alipay, with autoparts maker Wanxiang Group, and Tianjin Shanghui Investment with copper producer Huabei Group. Each of the five pairs, it seems, will focus on a specific customer segment and test a different banking business model. Initially, at least, the new banks being kept from going in direct competition with the big state banks’ existing businesses.

The Alibaba-Wanxiang partnership is intended to serve small and family businesses, which are likely to already by Alibaba customers, whereas the Shanghui-Huabei pairing would take only corporate clients. The Alibaba-Wanxiang bank will have caps on the size of the loans it can make and deposits it can take. Another pairing, social networking and online gaming company Tencent and Shenzhen-based Baiyeyuan Investment, will also have a cap on its loan size but will have a deposit minimum, not maximum.

What is not clear is the niche being carved out for the other two pairings, Shanghai investment companies JuneYao Group and Fosun Group, and Zhejiang’s electrical equipment maker Chint Group and industrial chemicals producer Huafon Group. Something in wealth management or personal finance seems likely for JuneYao-Fosun.

The five new private banks will be set up in Shanghai, Tianjin, Zhejiang and Guangdong. The banking regulator says they will start operating once they meet required standards, including forming a “living will” that will outline how the bank will shut down in an orderly manner in the event of a failure.

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