Trade For Two, And Two For Trade

The South Korea-U.S. free trade agreement comes into force today–as this Bystander feels sure you have noted in your diaries. It is tangental to our brief but worth noting in passing for several reasons. Beijing, Seoul and Tokyo hope to start the sharp end of talks on their own free trade agreement later this year. China is both being dragged and dragging its trade partners before the World Trade Organisation with some regularity. And while the next round of the WTO’s global free trade talks, the Doha round, is proceeding even more glacially than reform in China, free trade agreements are popping up everywhere.

Nearly three score have come into force since January 2008. The total in effect is fast approaching 300 and many more are being talked about. (Trade trivia question: now Mongolia has struck a free trade agreement with Japan, which is the one WTO member left that is not party to any free trade agreement?)

The days when free trade agreements were seen as undermining the multilateral global trading system seem distant memory. Bi- or limited plurilateral regional free trade agreements will shape trade policies for the foreseeable future. They are also more suitable for developing existing cross-border trade flows being created by the needs of global logistics chains. Whether they undermine the big benefit  of multilateral agreements, that they increase trade overall by lowering restrictions across the board, is moot. But then the Doha round isn’t doing anything to boost trade overall for as long as it remains stalled.

The most significant of the free trade agreements under discussion for  the Asia-Pacific region is the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TTP) that the U.S. is taking over. China is on the outside of that at this point. Japan is the swing state. If it joins the TTP, China’s exclusion will be of more consequence than if it does not. Another free trade agreement in the pipeline that has implications for China is one between the EU and India. Meanwhile, Washington and Seoul are putting in place another piece of the new world trade order.

Footnote: The answer is Mauritania.

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One response to “Trade For Two, And Two For Trade

  1. Pingback: Beijing, Tokyo and Seoul To Start Formal Free Trade Pact Talks | China Bystander

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