Beijing Hints At Flexing Its New Antitrust Muscles On Behalf Of Jilted Chinalco

There was obviously some wounded pride following the collapse of Chinalco’s proposed $19.5 billion investment in Rio Tinto. But to add insult to injury, Rio is now proposing an iron-ore joint venture with BHP Billiton in Western Australia.

Such a combination would account for 80% of the exports from one of China’s main sources of supply, Australia. To Chen Yanhai, who heads the raw materials department at the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology,  “The potential deal has an obvious color of monopoly. The joint venture is likely to have a big impact on the Chinese steel industry as China is the world’s biggest iron ore importer” (from CCTV via Reuters). “The deal should be subject to Chinese anti-monopoly law,” Chen adds.

That sting in the tail will raise some eyebrows among international M&A bankers. China’s anti-monopoly law says the ministry has to approve business combinations if the joint global revenue of the companies involved exceeds 10 billion yuan ($1.5 billion) or 2 billion yuan in China if two or more of the firms involved each cross a threshold of 400 million yuan of revenue in China during the previous accounting year. Both BHP and Rio have blazed past that. In the year ended June 30, the former’s revenue in China was $11.7 billion while the latter’s was $10.8 billion.

It is unclear what remedies would be imposed if the Rio-BHP deal was found to be monopolistic by Beijing (or even if it could apply such a ruling), but Chen indicated aid to domestic miners could be one. There have already been discussions around this between Canberra and Beijing at the diplomatic level, we hear. And BHP says it and Rio would be discussing the potential regulatory issues with Chinese officials, according to Reuters.

Meanwhile, Chinalco has to decide what to do with the stake in Rio it does hold, and whether to take up its allotment of Rio’s rights issue that is replacing its investment. It could dump its stock with a grumpy flourish and take the loss, not do that but not take up its rights issue allotment, thus diluting its stake, or take up its rights and hang in to see what develops. Patience rather than petulance might well be the right virtue in this instance.

1 Comment

Filed under China-Australia, Economy, Markets

One response to “Beijing Hints At Flexing Its New Antitrust Muscles On Behalf Of Jilted Chinalco

  1. Pingback: $60B Australian Coal Deal Is Good Business For China « China Bystander

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