BRICs and Brickbats Over The Dollar’s Reserve Currency Role

Brazil, Russia, India and China meet on Tuesday in Yekaterinburg for the first summit of the so-called BRICs, the four leading emerging economies.

They see themselves as a leading voice for the developing world and as a counterweight to the developed world’s dominance in international economic matters as represented by the G-7. As such they want to want to boost their role as global players and increase their collective weight in international organizations.

So far, they share too little in common beyond large, fast growing developing economies to have acted as a bloc. One arena in which they might have been expected to exert collective clout and to speak as one for the developing world was the seemingly interminable Doha round of world trade talks. Yet the interests of China’s low-tech farmers were different from those of their Indian counterparts and far too different from those of Brazil’s high-tech farmers for there to be any unity.

There is one issue that is emerging, however, on which they could speak with a common voice, and it is one on which Beijing has already been a herald: the challenge to the role of the dollar  as the world’s sole reserve currency. Beyond the statistics commonly trotted out to describe the BRICs — they cover a quarter of the world’s land surface, are home to 40% of the world’s people and account for 15% of world GDP– is one highly relevant to this issue: they hold 42% of global foreign exchange reserves.

As well as giving repeated airings to its concerns about the falling value of the dollar on all the U.S. debt it owns, Beijing has switched $50 billion of its admittedly more than $1 trillion of reserves into multi-currency based bonds issued by the International Monetary Fund. Russia has moved $10 billion and Brazil’s central bank has just announced it is doing the same with a similar amount of its reserves. The BRICs want more say over the IMF and are putting a bit of the money at least where their mouths are, and Beijing in particular would be most pleased for the IMF emerge as more of a counterweight in the global financial system to the U.S. The issue will figure prominently at the meeting in Yekaterinburg, a town historically redolent of executing the old order.

1 Comment

Filed under China-U.S., Economy

One response to “BRICs and Brickbats Over The Dollar’s Reserve Currency Role

  1. Pingback: Zhou Bangs On About The SDR As World Currency « China Bystander

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